Alexa

A roundup of our Girl Geek Dinner on 24th October

A roundup of our Girl Geek Dinner on 24th October 2000 1333 Esther Connock

We teamed up with the Bristol Girl Geek dinners network to host a Girl Geek event at XMOS HQ in Bristol. Over 45 people joined us to learn about the science of voice, see a little deeper into the magic of voice capture technology and find out how a virtual assistant can ‘hear’ your voice across a crowded room and execute your command.

It was a strong showcase of the talent in the South West, with female-identifying techies (and a few men) from across deep tech, finance, marketing, consulting and start-ups. The room was full of courage, easy camaraderie and razor-sharp minds, with representatives from the worlds of cyber-security, robotics, AI and imaging, together with others who are starting a business, freelance, starting a new life, studying or gone back to studying. With so energy and creativity across this space, it’s staggering that there’s still so little diversity.

Separating voice from noise

At the Girl Geek evening, we discussed how success of voice-enabled technology depends on its ability to identify when a human is talking and then isolate that voice signal from other noise such as room echo, other people talking, music and background or outside noise. This is achieved with a series of algorithms, housed on our silicon, which captures speech from across the room, cleans it up and sends the digital command to speech recognition service – such as Amazon Alexa.

Alex Craciun, our Algorithm Engineer, took us through the science of speech and explained that, if we know how speech is produced, we can extract features which model speech-like structures and from there create a speech detection algorithm to identify a speech source or a non-speech source accurately. Gwen Edwards, Director of Product Marketing, was then able to demonstrate the different techniques we use to extract human speech and clean up the digital signal – with the help of a talking lamp and an XMOS development kit that showed how far-field microphones and algorithms capture voice and strip out a cacophony of music to have a clear ‘Alexa ready’ voice command.

From understanding how this works, we then had a glimpse into the future at how other sensors (such as radar and imaging) will augment voice to make our interactions with technology more human. Once a voice assistant is able to sense our identity, mood, routine and personal preferences properly, it can start to evolve into something more meaningful – more like a trusted ‘digital twin’ or augmented extension of ourselves, than a tool to take orders.

Why are events such as Girl Geeks important?

Serrie-Justine Chapman, Founder of Women’s Tech Jobs says: “Bristol Girl Geek Dinners is a great network of over 850 members of brilliant, intelligent women. We welcome all women (or identifying as such) to the group whether already working in tech or simply tech-curious and wanting to see if there’s opportunity that might suit. I spent the majority of my career in that side of the industry, it’s dynamic, cutting edge and all about problem solving – great fun! I’m excited to watch the industry moves forward in such leaps and bounds and to see a Bristol based engineering company like XMOS being at the forefront of it all. Even more importantly, they’ve recognised the importance of encouraging women into the industry and are involving themselves in the change that’s needed. Our thanks to XMOS for a fabulous Girl Geek Dinner – everyone in the group is still buzzing from a great and welcoming evening!”

Here at XMOS, we look forward to holding more events like this one – and encouraging more women to come into (or back into) engineering and technology. The world’s changing and technology is moving at incredible speed – it’s time we Girl Geeks show just how much we can achieve!

XMOS is hiring!

If you’re interested in finding out more about what it’s like working for a leading company in the voice capture space, with partners such as Amazon Alexa and Infineon, you can browse our jobs or send us your CV with note about why you’d like to work here to work@xmos.com. We’d love to hear from you.

Girl Geeks? For sure. And we’re loud and proud about that.

Girl Geeks? For sure. And we’re loud and proud about that. 2000 1333 Esther Connock

At our Girl Geek Dinner on 24th October, we explored the marvel of the human voice.  In techie terms, each one of us is a piece of analogue kit and we all have a unique pitch, tone and frequency. Male and female voices have a fundamentally different pitch. Unfortunately, most people in our industry today operate at a low vocal pitch or to put it another way – we have a gender diversity problem.

We teamed up with the Bristol Girl Geek dinners network to host a Girl Geek event at XMOS HQ in Bristol. Over 45 people joined us to learn about the science of voice, see a little deeper into the magic of voice capture technology and find out how a virtual assistant can ‘hear’ your voice across a crowded room and execute your command.

It was a strong showcase of the talent in the South West, with female-identifying techies (and a few men) from across deep tech, finance, marketing, consulting and start-ups. The room was full of courage, easy camaraderie and razor-sharp minds, with representatives from the worlds of cyber-security, robotics, AI and imaging, together with others who are starting a business, freelance, starting a new life, studying or gone back to studying. With so energy and creativity across this space, it’s staggering that there’s still so little diversity.

Separating voice from noise

At the Girl Geek evening, we discussed how success of voice-enabled technology depends on its ability to identify when a human is talking and then isolate that voice signal from other noise such as room echo, other people talking, music and background or outside noise. This is achieved with a series of algorithms, housed on our silicon, which captures speech from across the room, cleans it up and sends the digital command to speech recognition service – such as Amazon Alexa.

Alex Craciun, our Algorithm Engineer, took us through the science of speech and explained that, if we know how speech is produced, we can extract features which model speech-like structures and from there create a speech detection algorithm to identify a speech source or a non-speech source accurately. Gwen Edwards, Director of Product Marketing, was then able to demonstrate the different techniques we use to extract human speech and clean up the digital signal – with the help of a talking lamp and an XMOS development kit that showed how far-field microphones and algorithms capture voice and strip out a cacophony of music to have a clear ‘Alexa ready’ voice command.

From understanding how this works, we then had a glimpse into the future at how other sensors (such as radar and imaging) will augment voice to make our interactions with technology more human. Once a voice assistant is able to sense our identity, mood, routine and personal preferences properly, it can start to evolve into something more meaningful – more like a trusted ‘digital twin’ or augmented extension of ourselves, than a tool to take orders.

Why are events such as Girl Geeks important?

Serrie-Justine Chapman, Founder of Women’s Tech Jobs says: “Bristol Girl Geek Dinners is a great network of over 850 members of brilliant, intelligent women. We welcome all women (or identifying as such) to the group whether already working in tech or simply tech-curious and wanting to see if there’s opportunity that might suit. I spent the majority of my career in that side of the industry, it’s dynamic, cutting edge and all about problem solving – great fun! I’m excited to watch the industry moves forward in such leaps and bounds and to see a Bristol based engineering company like XMOS being at the forefront of it all. Even more importantly, they’ve recognised the importance of encouraging women into the industry and are involving themselves in the change that’s needed. Our thanks to XMOS for a fabulous Girl Geek Dinner – everyone in the group is still buzzing from a great and welcoming evening!”

So, if we want to move the needle on the dial on gender diversity in engineering where do we start? Well, we know that having designated spaces and events for shared learning and networking is proving important for female-identifying individuals in male dominated industries. Promoting effective forms of skills sharing, particularly with networking events lets females absorb experience from others and share experiences with others who are treading a similar path. We’re often at our most aspirational when bouncing ideas and questions off like-minded people. This can be a daunting task for many when faced with a diversity chasm in the room – as is all too often the case with technology events.

If we take a closer look at the issue, simple maths tells us that there are more men in the engineering industry today – so of course it’s going to feel imbalanced. Figures from the Office of National Statistics from Q4 2017 and other reports suggest the UK has the lowest percentage of female engineering professionals in Europe, at just 11 per cent.

To correct that, we have to look at industry representation. Last year, the Joint Council for Qualifications revealed there is now very little gender difference in take up of and achievement in core STEM GCSE subjects. Which sounds like good very news. Unfortunately, the IET also confirmed last year that a mere 15.1 per cent of engineering undergraduates in the UK in 2017 were women. So, how can this drop off be explained? Why aren’t women pursuing engineering in Higher Education? Why is the industry failing to attract women?

Businesses must step up to address the challenge

In short, this industry needs to get smart on making it an attractive workplace for women – with clear career prospects and policies that reflect that. And this needs to happen fast. Everyone across the industry has a role to play in making sure we don’t lose some of the brightest talent available. The UK has a real opportunity to take the lead on breaking down the barriers to entry for women in voice-enabled technology and highlight the endless possibilities for career progression that this and the wider engineering industry has to offer.

And as for us girl geeks? Let’s call time on holding back from opportunities. Seize the day and get your confidence on – the world’s changing. Technology is moving at incredible speed. And it’s time we show just how much we can achieve.

XMOS is hiring!

If you’re interested in finding out more about what it’s like working for a leading company in the voice capture space, with partners such as Amazon Alexa and Infineon, you can browse our jobs or send us your CV with note about why you’d like to work here to work@xmos.com. We’d love to hear from you.

Talkin’ bout the Alexa Generation – by Mark Lippett

Talkin’ bout the Alexa Generation – by Mark Lippett 2000 1333 Esther Connock

“Alexa. Who or what is the Alexa Generation

When staying with friends last weekend, I asked their 6-year-old if she had a favourite song. ‘Alexa. Play Taylor Swift Shake it Off’, she immediately commanded their Echo device. As someone who lives and breathes voice interfaces, there was something about this casual, matter-of-fact interaction that really struck me – and it got me thinking.

The Alexa Generation is here – children are now growing up with voice-enabled technologies around them as the everyday familiar. By the time these children are teenagers, they’ll expect devices to be voice-enabled and their lifestyles will be inflected by digital assistants in a way unlike any generation before them.

Our Alexa Children will interact fluently, efficiently and naturally with their voice-enabled devices. They will search using voice, not text. Already, one in four 16 to 24 year olds use voice search on mobile … that’s one in four searches made by voice. Text based commands will decline as our Alexa Children form increasingly human relationships with technology. They’ll take their virtual assistants with them wherever they go.They’ll navigate websites by voice. And a remote control will look as strange to them as a cassette tape does to millennials.

Alexa children show a different pattern of usage

According to research from Childwise, 42 per cent of children aged between nine and 16 use voice recognition gadgets at home. And unlike many adults, children are using it for more than music streaming. They’re turning to these virtual assistants for help with homework, to look up facts and check spelling.

Some worry that the growth of voice technology could have an adverse effect on how children learn to communicate, However, for every skeptic there is an evangelist; Solace Shen, a researcher at Cornell who studied interactions between children and technology, says she sees opportunities for educational and entertainment content on voice-enabled devices that doesn’t “suck kids in”, in the same way that a smartphone does.

Indeed, universal voice commands, such as those used to instruct the Echo, come as naturally to the Alexa Generation as Windows and Mac operating systems came to their generational predecessors. And perhaps voice will bring us a behavioural shift – or at least a better balance between screen-time and time spent engaged in active listening.

We’re moving towards a more natural conversation with technology

Over 39 million Americans now own an Echo, and yet many of those are using a fraction of Alexa’s capabilities. Why? Well, it turns out that adults feel very self-conscious addressing technology directly. According to KDDI’s 2017 voice search study of the Japanese population, 70 per cent of users said it’s “embarrassing to voice search in front of others.” And when asked how they used voice-enabled devices at home, 40 per cent of respondents said, “I only do so with nobody in the house.”

The Alexa Generation vault clear of this barrier. There is a fluidity with which the Alexa Children interact with voice-enabled technologies that’s free of inhibition. This, coupled with advancements in human-machine interface technology, means that over time, the friction between human and machine interactions will erode away, until a conversation with the Internet of Things feels as natural as a conversation with a parent, friend or sibling.

Digital assistants will simply blend into the fabric of our lives

For the Alexa Generation, voice control seems as natural as the English rain. The culture and lifestyle of those growing up with voice-enabled technologies will be worlds apart from that of those born in the ‘80s and ‘90s. It’ll be defined by a cooperative co-existence with AI and technology, whereby voice-activated digital assistants become an integral, trusted part of everyday life.

Today, a demonstration of Alexa’s talents brings about surprise and fuels dinner-table discussion, but tomorrow, digital assistants will simply blend into the fabric of the lives of the Alexa Children. That the novelty will wear off is something to be celebrated, because it’ll marks the point when voice-assisted devices start to fulfill their full potential as tools (not toys) and heralds the passing of the torch from the Millennials to the Alexa Generation.

“Hallo Magenta” – XMOS VocalFusion helps to bring Deutsche Telekom’s new smart speaker to life

“Hallo Magenta” – XMOS VocalFusion helps to bring Deutsche Telekom’s new smart speaker to life 4032 3024 Esther Connock
Bristol/Berlin 1 October 2018

XMOS, leading supplier of voice and audio solutions, are proud to be part of the team that helped to create Magenta – Deutsche Telekom’s smart speaker, which delivers superior 360 degree far field voice control and sophisticated audio in a small, attractive and portable design.

Using XMOS’s high-performance silicon and voice algorithms, experts at the Hearing, Speech and Audio Technology branch at Fraunhofer’s Institute for Digital Media Technology (IDMT) in Oldenburg, Germany, were able to refine and combine microphone and loudspeaker technologies to create a robust voice control system that allows the user to listen to music at the same time as using voice command controls.

Launched at this year’s IFA in Berlin, the Magenta Smart Speaker unites all the algorithms necessary for maximum quality and accurate audio reproduction. Combined with intelligent algorithms for speech capture – integrated on XMOS voice processor – the teams collaborated to optimise the interaction between speakers and microphones for voice control in real world, noisy environments.

Key features

  • Using the Magenta intelligent personal assistant, voice control can be used to operate connected devices in the home such as TV and Deutsche Telekom’s smart home applications without the need for a remote control.
  • The personal assistant can also be used to make telephone calls with excellent audio quality.
  • Users of Amazon’s cloud-based Alexa Voice Service can also access a large number of apps with Deutsche Telekom’s smart speaker.
  • The new voice-controlled assistant conforms to the highest data security requirements. Data processing takes place exclusively within the European Union and complies with Deutsche Telekom’s high data protection standards.

“We’re proud to be part of the Magenta project. Our combined expertise has produced a class-leading user experience, demonstrating highly sophisticated audio and speech recognition” said Mark Lippett, CEO of XMOS. “Voice control in smart speakers is here to stay. We look forward to further collaborations with Fraunhofer IDMT in Oldenburg.”

 

About XMOS

XMOS is a leading supplier of voice and audio solutions to the consumer electronics market. Unique silicon architecture and highly differentiated software positions XMOS at the interface between voice processing, biometrics and artificial intelligence. For more information, please visit www.xmos.com, or email press@xmos.com.

About the Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology IDMT in Oldenburg

The objective of the Fraunhofer IDMT in Oldenburg is to transpose scientific findings related to hearing perception into technological applications. Its applied research priorities are the enhancement of sound and speech intelligibility, personalized audio reproduction and acoustic speech and event detection. Application fields include consumer electronics, transport, the automotive sector, production, safety, telecommunications and healthcare. For more information, please visit www.idmt.fraunhofer.de/hsa.

Media Contact

Emma Davies
Red Lorry Yellow Lorry – PR agency for XMOS
emmad@rlyl.com
+44 (0)20 7403 8878

Tymphany and XMOS to showcase new soundbar at IFA with Alexa built-In

Tymphany and XMOS to showcase new soundbar at IFA with Alexa built-In 6000 4500 admin

Tymphany, a global premier audio ODM, and XMOS, a leading supplier of advanced embedded voice solutions, announced the latest project in building a new Alexa Built-In soundbar that will be demonstrated at Amazon’s exhibit at IFA in Berlin, 31 August to 5 September 2018.

The Amazon Alexa Built-In soundbar features XMOS Vocal Fusion™ far-field voice processor as well as Tymphany’s acoustic expertise to create an immersive audio experience. The low frequency bass extension powered by Tymphany’s patented, slim profile GBS subwoofers allows for smooth frequency response down to 50 Hz. Using Tymphany’s A113D SOM and XMOS’ XVF3500 stereo-AEC voice processor, the soundbar connects with the Amazon Alexa Voice Service (AVS) via WiFi and has an excellent far-field voice capture and barge-in performance from across the room – even when the Tymphany soundbar is playing content at high volume and the commands are spoken softly. The soundbar will include Amazon’s signature LED light ring response and buttons, as well as provide access to Amazon Prime Music and TuneIn support.

“We’re proud to have helped bring this project to life”, added Mark Lippett, CEO of XMOS: “This new soundbar showcases the innovation, dedication and collaboration of the international partners involved.”

With Tymphany’s extensive resources and global engineering team, they have deep expertise and excellent partnerships across the entire signal chain, enabling them to deliver products that offer unique combinations of user experiences and features not achieved by other audio ODMs.

“Tymphany and XMOS have created a soundbar that enhances the listening experience by providing simple, hands-free interaction with Alexa,” said Priya Abani, Director of the Alexa Voice Service. “We’re excited to have a new solution that brings rich voice capabilities to our customers.”

“We are extremely excited to introduce the Tymphany Alexa Built-In soundbar this year at IFA 2018. We are proud of our team’s efforts to realize this complex, groundbreaking and great performing soundbar reference design. We would not have been able to achieve this milestone without the awesome support of the Amazon Alexa Voice Service and XMOS development teams”, says Chris von Hellermann, Senior Director of Technology Management at Tymphany.

You can see and hear this demo and more at the Amazon booth in Hall 26, booth 201 at IFA this August 31st to September 5th in Berlin.

About Tymphany

Tymphany designs and manufactures some of the most innovative consumer and professional audio systems on the market. The company also sells a full line of speaker drivers under the Peerless by Tymphany brand. The company’s roots go back to 1926 when Peerless was founded in Denmark. In the proceeding 90+ years, Tymphany has grown to be a global premier audio ODM with over 6,000 employees around the world. For more information visit www.tymphany.com.

About XMOS

XMOS is a leading supplier of voice and audio solutions to the consumer electronics market. Unique silicon architecture and highly differentiated software positions XMOS at the interface between voice processing, biometrics and artificial intelligence. For more information, please visit www.xmos.com, or email press@xmos.com.

Another world first for Bristol company XMOS

Another world first for Bristol company XMOS 3868 2589 Steve Palmer

Announcing the first stereo-AEC far-field linear development kit for AVS, qualified by Amazon.

XMOS Ltd, a leading supplier of advanced embedded voice and audio solutions to the consumer electronics market, today announced its VocalFusion Stereo Dev Kit for Amazon AVS, the first linear mic array solution qualified by Amazon for far-field performance that supports stereo acoustic echo cancellation. This XMOS development kit is designed for developers working in the growing Alexa-enabled smart TV, soundbar, set-top box, and digital media adapter market segments, all of which require true stereo-AEC support to deliver compelling “across the room” voice-interface solutions

“This is the second XMOS kit for the Alexa Voice Service that is qualified by Amazon,” said Mark Lippett, President and CEO at XMOS commenting on the announcement. “The kit for AVS we launched in October last year was another ‘first to market’ that we delivered for developers, generating significant interest from companies working on new linear form factors. That positive customer feedback and encouragement from Amazon has driven us to rapidly develop this stereo kit for new Alexa-enabled audio and visual equipment, and demonstrates the benefits and agility of our programmable XMOS technology.”

“As Alexa expands beyond table-top experiences and into edge-of-room devices, developers are looking for new ways to integrate Alexa seamlessly into the home environment where she can respond from anywhere in the room,” said Priya Abani, Director, Alexa Voice Service at Amazon. “This new stereo far-field linear development kit for AVS from XMOS provides the thin-form factor and high performance needed for these new device types. It opens up fresh opportunities to add Alexa in new ways to stereo home entertainment and wall-mounted AV equipment.”

The VocalFusion Stereo Kit for Amazon AVS (XK-VF3500-L33-AVS) is available to developers, OEMs, and ODMs from Digi-Key.

About VocalFusion Stereo Dev Kit for Amazon AVS

The kit is based on the XVF3500 voice processor, which delivers sophisticated voice digital signal processing that includes 2-channel full duplex acoustic echo cancellation (AEC). As with all other XMOS VocalFusion voice solutions, commands are accurately captured from across the room for processing by the Alexa Voice Service, even in complex, noisy acoustic environments.

The processor interfaces directly to four PDM microphones in a linear array with 33.33mm inter-mic spacing making it ideal for integration into flat screens and products found “at the edge of the room”.

About XMOS

XMOS is a leading supplier of voice and audio solutions to the consumer electronics market. The combination of its unique silicon architecture and highly differentiated software positions it at the interface between voice processing, biometrics and artificial intelligence. For more information, please visit www.xmos.com,

During Mobile World Congress, Barcelona, XMOS will be in a Hall 7 Meeting Room, 26th February -1st March 2018, by appointment only.

eMeet and XMOS announce partnership to enable eMeet AI Office Assistant with leading edge far-field voice technology

eMeet and XMOS announce partnership to enable eMeet AI Office Assistant with leading edge far-field voice technology 300 227 Esther Connock

XMOS today announced that its VocalFusion™ voice technology has been selected by Shenzhen eMeet Technology Co for its mobile smart office assistant, eMeet OfficeCore M1. This commercial solution, which is available now from online retail stores, is the first output of this partnership.

The compact and portable speaker uses a USB and Bluetooth connection with a mobile phone or laptop to convert any space into a conference call facility. XMOS VocalFusion technology was chosen for its ability to detect and isolate the spoken word within 8 metres in all directions, thanks to far-field voice recognition capability and an array of seven eMeet 360° omni-directional microphones. The XMOS XVF3000 voice processor uses acoustic echo cancellation (AEC) to remove playback audio from the microphone signal allowing users to barge-in and talk over the playback signal. Automated noise suppression (ANS) and dereverberation technologies are used to remove unwanted noise and echoes in the captured signal, providing a crystal clear output signal. The microphone follows a voice as it moves around the room (via beamforming), and ensures that even the quietest person in the room can be easily heard.

“We chose the XMOS VocalFusion technology for our eMeet OfficeCore M1 because of the superior far-field voice technology and unrivalled processing power it can deliver for thin client applications,” said Wyman Chen, CEO at eMeet. “Our product is aimed at the professional conference call market, so quality of voice capture, noise isolation and AEC were key to the design. We’re extremely pleased with the result and the benefits that the XMOS technology has delivered to our product.”

Commenting on the announcement, Mark Lippett, President and CEO at XMOS, said “The eMeet solution is a typical example of the type of work our teams are involved in with professional and consumer electronics companies worldwide. Our technology is perfectly suited to addressing the issues of conference call quality in noisy environments, and eMeet has used this capability to deliver a superior product for business environments. We are seeing a huge demand for the benefits that our VocalFusion technology can deliver in an unprecedented range of applications and eMeet is one of the first companies to realize that potential in a commercial product.”

To discover more about the eMeet OfficeCore M1, visit www.eMeet.ai.

About XMOS

XMOS is a leading supplier of voice and audio solutions to the consumer electronics market. The combination of its unique silicon architecture and highly differentiated software positions it at the interface between voice processing, biometrics and artificial intelligence. For more information, see www.xmos.com.

About eMeet

eMeet is an innovation-leading company, focused on mobile meeting solutions. We combine a unique voice product, AI service and multi-party information communication technologies to serve global users. eMeet solutions deliver greater value and improvements to the office efficiency of our end customers. For more information, please visit www.eMeet.ai.

XMOS delivers first Amazon Alexa Voice Service development kit with linear mic array for far-field voice capture

XMOS delivers first Amazon Alexa Voice Service development kit with linear mic array for far-field voice capture 5471 3904 Esther Connock

XMOS announced today announced its VocalFusion 4-Mic Dev Kit for Amazon Alexa Voice Service (AVS) is the first far-field, mono-AEC, linear mic array solution available. The XMOS kit is ideal for developers who want to integrate Alexa into smart panels, kitchen appliances, and other commercial and industrial electronics.

The kit features a compact four-microphone linear 100mm array. The captured voice signals are crystal clear even in noisy environments, enabling commands to be accurately captured from across the room for processing by the Alexa cloud-based speech recognition system. XMOS is the only solution to date that packs audio digital signal processing (DSP) and programmable I/O processing and control software into a single chip, enabling customers to significantly reduce their bill of materials, flexibly tailor their designs, and reduce costs.

The VocalFusion 4-Mic Dev Kit for Amazon AVS is the first development kit to feature a reference client built using the recently released AVS Device SDK. The AVS Device SDK is designed to further simplify the experience of creating Alexa-enabled products, thereby helping commercial device makers get AVS products to market faster.

“We’re delighted to work with XMOS as they introduce the first far-field linear mic array AVS solution, making it easier for developers and OEMs to build Alexa-enabled products,” said Priya Abani, Director, Amazon Alexa. “XMOS’ VocalFusion 4-Mic Dev Kit for Amazon AVS will accelerate the deployment of Alexa in deeply embedded systems, new device types, and form-factors, bringing customers more choice of where to access Alexa.”

At the heart of the XMOS solution is the VocalFusion XVF3000, a highly integrated far-field voice processor based on the XMOS award-winning xCORE multicore architecture. The XVF3000 delivers sophisticated voice DSP capability including a full duplex acoustic echo canceller (AEC) with barge-in capability that enables users to interrupt or pause a device that’s playing music, and sophisticated noise suppression with adaptive beamforming to provide high quality voice interaction experiences even in noisy environments.

“We’re excited to collaborate with Amazon, the pioneer in voice-enabled consumer solutions. We believe that our homes and offices will very soon be smart environments, and that voice provides the most convenient and intuitive solution to control the many machines that surround us,” said Mark Lippett, President and CEO at XMOS. “Solutions like ours enable developers to bring to market connected products that can be used with simplicity, in our own natural spoken language. We are working with our partners to accelerate the adoption of AVS as the voice solution of choice for the Internet of Things.”

The VocalFusion 4-Mic Kit for Amazon AVS (XK-VF3000-L33-AVS) is immediately available to developers, OEMs, and ODMs from Digi-Key.

About XMOS

XMOS is a leading supplier of voice and audio solutions to the consumer electronics market. The combination of its unique silicon architecture and highly differentiated software positions it at the interface between voice processing, biometrics and artificial intelligence. For more information, see www.xmos.com.